Approach to equilibrium in a pure-state universe

(This post is vague, and sheer speculation.)

Following a great conversation with Miles Stoudenmire here at PI, I went back and read a paper I forgot about: “Entanglement and the foundations of statistical mechanics” by Popescu et al.S. Popescu, A. Short, and A. Winter, “Entanglement and the foundations of statistical mechanics” Nature Physics 2, 754 – 758 (2006) [Free PDF].a  . This is one of those papers that has a great simple idea, where you’re not sure if it’s profound or trivial, and whether it’s well known or it’s novel. (They cite references 3-6 as “Significant results along similar lines”; let me know if you’ve read any of these and think they’re more useful.) Anyways, here’s some background on how I think about this.

If a pure quantum state \vert \psi \rangle is drawn at random (according to the Haar measure) from a d_S d_E-dimensional vector space \mathcal{H}, then the entanglement entropy

    \[S(\rho_S) = \mathrm{Tr}[\rho_S \mathrm{log} \rho_S], \qquad \rho_S = \mathrm{Tr}_E[\vert \psi \rangle \langle \psi \vert]\]

across a tensor decomposition into system \mathcal{S} and environment \mathcal{E} is highly likely to be almost the maximum

    \[S_{\mathrm{max}} = \mathrm{log}_2(\mathrm{min}(d_S,d_E)) \,\, \mathrm{bits},\]

for any such choice of decomposition \mathcal{H} = \mathcal{S} \otimes \mathcal{E}. More precisely, if we fix d_S/d_E and let d_S\to \infty, then the fraction of the Haar volume of states that have entanglement entropy more than an exponentially small (in d_S) amount away from the maximum is suppressed exponentially (in d_S). This was known as Page’s conjectureD. Page, Average entropy of a subsystem.b  , and was later provedS. Foong and S. Kanno, Proof of Page’s conjecture on the average entropy of a subsystem.c  J. Sánchez-Ruiz, Simple proof of Page’s conjecture on the average entropy of a subsystem.d  ; it is a straightforward consequence of the concentration of measure phenomenon.… [continue reading]

Undetected photon imaging

Lemos et al. have a relatively recent letterG. Lemos, V. Borish, G. Cole, S. Ramelow, R. Lapkiewicz, and A. Zeilinger, “Quantum imaging with undetected photons”, Nature 512, 409 (2014) [ arXiv:1401.4318 ].a   in Nature where they describe a method of imaging with undetected photons. (An experiment with the same essential quantum features was performed by Zou et al.X. Y. Zou, L. J. Wang, and L. Mandel, “Induced coherence and indistinguishability in optical interference”, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 318 (1991) [ PDF ].b   way back in 1991, but Lemos et al. have emphasized its implications for imaging.) The idea is conceptually related to decoherence detection, and I want to map one onto the other to flesh out the connection. Their figure 1 gives a schematic of the experiment, and is copied below.

The first two paragraphs of the letter contain all the meat, encrypted and condensed into an opaque nugget of the kind that Nature loves; it stands as a good example of the lamentable way many quantum experimental articles are written. Anyways, the rest of the letter is a straightforward application of the secret sauce.“But Jess”, you object, “shouldn’t Lemos et al. just concentrate on the part they are adding — the imaging application — and include only a cryptic and confusing summary of the prior work on which they build?” No way, Jose. Their imaging applications are only remotely interesting because of the quantum aspects that are contained in the original experiment. (No one would have cared about the last 80% of the letter if it weren’t spookily using undetected photons crucially dependent on quantum effects.) It is absolutely critical that the reader understand exactly what’s going on in the beginning for them to appreciate the claimed importance of this application, and this is extremely hard to do if it requires pulling up a 23 year old paper and trying to match up different terminology and notation, not to mention the fact that the extensive experimental details in that paper really aren’t relevant to notibility.[continue reading]

Quantum Brownian motion: Definition

In this post I’m going to give a clean definition of idealized quantum Brownian motion and give a few entry points into the literature surrounding its abstract formulation. A follow-up post will give an interpretation to the components in the corresponding dynamical equation, and some discussion of how the model can be generalized to take into account the ways the idealization may break down in the real world.

I needed to learn this background for a paper I am working on, and I was motivated to compile it here because the idiosyncratic results returned by Google searches, and especially this MathOverflow question (which I’ve answered), made it clear that a bird’s eye view is not easy to find. All of the material below is available in the work of other authors, but not logically developed in the way I would prefer.

Preliminaries

Quantum Brownian motion (QBM) is a prototypical and idealized case of a quantum system \mathcal{S}, consisting of a continuous degree of freedom, that is interacting with a large multi-partite environment \mathcal{E}, in general leading to varying degrees of dissipation, dispersion, and decoherence of the system. Intuitively, the distinguishing characteristics of QBM is Markovian dynamics induced by the cumulative effect of an environment with many independent, individually weak, and (crucially) “phase-space local” components. We will defined QBM as a particular class of ways that a density matrix may evolve, which may be realized (or approximately realized) by many possible system-environment models. There is a more-or-less precise sense in which QBM is the simplest quantum model capable of reproducing classical Brownian motion in a \hbar \to 0 limit.

In words to be explained: QBM is a class of possible dynamics for an open, quantum, continuous degree of freedom in which the evolution is specified by a quadratic Hamiltonian and linear Lindblad operators.… [continue reading]

In what sense is the Wigner function a quasiprobability distribution?

For the upteenth time I have read a paper introducing the Wigner function essentially like this:

The Wigner-representation of a quantum state \rho is a real-valued function on phase space definedActually, they usually use a more confusing definition. See my post on the intuitive definition of the Wigner function.a   (with \hbar=1) as

(1)   \begin{align*} W_\rho(x,p) \equiv \int \! \mathrm{d}\Delta x \, e^{i p \Delta x} \langle x+\Delta x /2 \vert \rho \vert x-\Delta x /2 \rangle. \end{align*}

It’s sort of like a probability distribution because the marginals reproduce the probabilities for position and momentum measurements:

(2)   \begin{align*} P(x) \equiv \langle x \vert \rho \vert x \rangle = \int \! \mathrm{d}p \, W_\rho(x,p) \end{align*}

and

(3)   \begin{align*} P(p) \equiv  \langle p\vert \rho \vert p \rangle = \int \! \mathrm{d}x \, W_\rho(x,p). \end{align*}

But the reason it’s not a real probability distribution is that it can be negative.

The fact that W_\rho(x,p) can be negative is obviously a reason you can’t think about it as a true PDF, but the marginals property is a terribly weak justification for thinking about W_\rho as a “quasi-PDF”. There are all sorts of functions one could write down that would have this same property but wouldn’t encode much information about actual phase space structure, e.g., the Jigner“Jess” + “Wigner” = “Jigner”. Ha!b   function J_\rho(x,p) \equiv P(x)P(p) = \langle x \vert \rho \vert x \rangle \langle p \vert \rho \vert p \rangle, which tells as nothing whatsoever about how position relates to momentum.

Here is the real reason you should think the Wigner function W_\rho is almost, but not quite, a phase-space PDF for a state \rho:

  1. Consider an arbitrary length scale \sigma_x, which determines a corresponding momentum scale \sigma_p = 1/2\sigma_x and a corresponding setNot just a set of states, actually, but a Parseval tight frame. They have a characteristic spatial and momentum width \sigma_x and \sigma_p, and are indexed by \alpha = (x,p) as it ranges over phase space.c   of coherent states \{ \vert \alpha \rangle \}.
  2. If a measurement is performed on \rho with the POVM of coherent states \{ \vert \alpha \rangle \langle \alpha \vert \}, then the probability of obtaining outcome \alpha is given by the Husimi Q function representation of \rho:

    (4)   \begin{align*} Q_\rho(\alpha) = \langle \alpha \vert \rho \vert \alpha \rangle. \end{align*}

  3. If \rho can be constructed as a mixture of the coherent states \{ \vert \alpha \rangle \}, thenOf course, the P function cannot always be defined, and sometimes it can be defined but only if it takes negative values.
[continue reading]

State-independent consistent sets

In May, Losada and Laura wrote a paperM. Losada and R. Laura, Annals of Physics 344, 263 (2014).a   pointing out the equivalence between two conditions on a set of “elementary histories” (i.e. fine-grained historiesGell-Mann and Hartle usually use the term “fine-grained set of histories” to refer to a set generated by the finest possible partitioning of histories in path integral (i.e. a point in space for every point in time), but this is overly specific. As far as the consistent histories framework is concerned, the key mathematical property that defines a fine-grained set is that it’s an exhaustive and exclusive set where each history is constructed by choosing exactly one projector from a fixed orthogonal resolution of the identity at each time.b  ). Let the elementary histories \alpha = (a_1, \dots, a_N) be defined by projective decompositions of the identity P^{(i)}_{a_i}(t_i) at time steps t_i (i=1,\ldots,N), so that

(1)   \begin{align*} P^{(i)}_a &= (P^{(i)}_a)^\dagger \quad \forall i,a \\ P^{(i)}_a P^{(i)}_b &= \delta_{a,b} P^{(i)}_a \quad \forall i,a,b\\ \sum_{a} P^{(i)}_a (t_i) &= I \quad  \forall i,k \\ C_\alpha &= P^{(N)}_{a_N} (t_N) \cdots P^{(1)}_{a_1} (t_1) \\ I &= \sum_\alpha C_\alpha = \sum_{a_1}\cdots \sum_{a_N} C_\alpha \\ \end{align*}

where C_\alpha are the class operators. Then Losada and Laura showed that the following two conditions are equivalent

  1. The set is consistent“Medium decoherent” in Gell-Mann and Hartle’s terminology. Also note that Losada and Laura actually work with the obsolete condition of “weak decoherence”, but this turns out to be an unimportance difference. For a summary of these sorts of consistency conditions, see my round-up.c   for any state: D(\alpha,\beta) = \mathrm{Tr}[C_\alpha \rho C_\beta^\dagger] = 0 \quad \forall \alpha \neq \beta, \forall \rho.
  2. The Heisenberg-picture projectors at all times commute: [P^{(i)}_{a} (t_i),P^{(j)}_{b} (t_j)]=0 \quad \forall i,j,a,b.

However, this is not as general as one would like because assuming the set of histories is elementary is very restrictive. (It excludes branch-dependent sets, sets with inhomogeneous histories, and many more types of sets that we would like to work with.) Luckily, their proof can be extended a bit.

Let’s forget that we have any projectors P^{(i)}_{a} and just consider a consistent set \{ C_\alpha \}.… [continue reading]

How to think about Quantum Mechanics—Part 2: Vacuum fluctuations

[Other parts in this series: .]

Although it is possible to use the term “vacuum fluctuations” in a consistent manner, referring to well-defined phenomena, people are usually way too sloppy. Most physicists never think clearly about quantum measurements, so the term is widely misunderstood and should be avoided if possible. Maybe the most dangerous result of this is the confident, unexplained use of this term by experienced physicists talking to students; it has the awful effect of giving these student the impression that their inevitable confusion is normal and not indicative of deep misunderstanding“Professor, where do the wiggles in the cosmic microwave background come from?” “Quantum fluctuations”. “Oh, um…OK.” (Yudkowsky has usefully called this a “curiosity-stopper”, although I’m sure there’s another term for this used by philosophers of science.)a  .

Here is everything you need to know:

  1. A measurement is specified by a basis, not by an observable. (If you demand to think in terms of observables, just replace “measurement basis” with “eigenbasis of the measured observable” in everything that follows.)
  2. Real-life processes amplify microscopic phenomena to macroscopic scales all the time, thereby effectively performing a quantum measurement. (This includes inducing the implied wave-function collapse). These do not need to involve a physicist in a lab, but the basis being measured must be an orthogonal one.W. H. Zurek, Phys. Rev. A 76, 052110 (2007). [arXiv:quant-ph/0703160]b  
  3. “Quantum fluctuations” are when any measurement (whether involving a human or not) is made in a basis which doesn’t commute with the initial state of the system.
  4. A “vacuum fluctuation” is when the ground state of a system is measured in a basis that does not include the ground state; it’s merely a special case of a quantum fluctuation.
[continue reading]

Lindblad Equation is differential form of CP map

The Master equation in Lindblad form (aka the Lindblad equation) is the most general possible evolution of an open quantum system that is Markovian and time-homogeneous. Markovian means that the way in which the density matrix evolves is determined completely by the current density matrix. This is the assumption that there are no memory effects, i.e. that the environment does not store information about earlier state of the system that can influence the system in the future.Here’s an example of a memory effect: An atom immersed in an electromagnetic field can be in one of two states, excited or ground. If it is in an excited state then, during a time interval, it has a certain probability of decaying to the ground state by emitting a photon. If it is in the ground state then it also has a chance of becoming excited by the ambient field. The situation where the atom is in a space of essentially infinite size would be Markovian, because the emitted photon (which embodies a record of the atom’s previous state of excitement) would travel away from the atom never to interact with it again. It might still become excited because of the ambient field, but its chance of doing so isn’t influenced by its previous state. But if the atom is in a container with reflecting walls, then the photon might be reflected back towards the atom, changing the probability that it becomes excited during a later period.a   Time-homogeneous just means that the rule for stochastically evolving the system from one time to the next is the same for all times.

Given an arbitrary orthonormal basis L_n of the space of operators on the N-dimensional Hilbert space of the system (according to the Hilbert-Schmidt inner product \langle A,B \rangle = \mathrm{Tr}[A^\dagger B]), the Lindblad equation takes the following form:

(1)   \begin{align*} \frac{\mathrm{d}}{\mathrm{d}t} \rho=- i[H,\rho]+\sum_{n,m = 1}^{N^2-1} h_{n,m}\left(L_n\rho L_m^\dagger-\frac{1}{2}\left(\rho L_m^\dagger L_n + L_m^\dagger L_n\rho\right)\right) , \end{align*}

with \hbar=1.… [continue reading]